AVRIL LAVIGNE’S MAKE FIVE WISHES

AVRIL LAVIGNE’S MAKE 5 WISHES
Written and Drawn by Avril Lavigne, Camilla D’Errico, and Joshua Dysart
Published by Del Rey

REPRINTED FROM CWR 2.0

Del Rey offers up its first-ever original English language manga with this book, the latest graphic novel effort revolving around the work of a music star. Tokyopop had a book from Courtney Love, Dark Horse has one coming from Gerard Way, and Image has a book coming from Coheed and Cambria. It’s enough to make you wonder if Marvel will reprint NIGHTCAT… the horror… the horror…

5 WISHES introduces Hana, a young girl who is floating though her teenage years in an introverted haze. Virtually friendless, she spends her time on the internet, using fake identities to chat with her classmates and mess with their lives. Her parents are raging at one another, their marriage in shambles, and the one person she talks to is an imaginary version of her favorite singer, Lavigne. Her rich fantasy life, though, is no substitute for the real life she craves, so she responds to an ad for a website that on the surface seems like a scam. However, the website is all-too-real, a fact she learns quickly when a package from the site arrives, and it contains a small demon who stands ready to grant five wishes for the young girl. But as we have been told time and time again in our lives… be careful what you wish for- you just might get it.

The book draws heavily from classic stories like “The Monkey’s Paw,” but that isn’t necessarily a bad thing. The fun in these types of stories is in the creativity used by the creators in how the wishes can go horribly awry. Hana is forcibly placed in an “adopt a grandchild” type of program early in the book, and when she wishes that the man won’t want to see her anymore… the results are nasty and tragic. The rest of the wishes aren’t quite as clever, but the book is still successful in what it’s aiming to do.

Done in color and printed on glossy paper, 5 WISHES looks lovely, and D’Errico is a real find. While there’s reason to be wary of any book coming from the inspiration of a music star, this is an above average effort and worth a look.

Marc Mason