KILL-SNOT-HORIZON

KILL-SNOT-HORIZON
Written and Drawn by Various
Published by Image Comics

Reviewed by Marc Mason

Three quite interesting new efforts from today’s house of ideas.

I’m a huge fan of writer Ed Brubaker and artist Sean Phillips’ oeuvre; they consistently turn out high quality stories and art, material that engages the read on multiple levels, and comics that do not give the reader and easy way out. They tend to sneer at happy endings, and why not? Why not challenge the reader? Why not lead the story to a natural conclusion, rather than a forced one?

These guys are brilliant at that.

KillOrBeKilled_01-1

With that, I have to admit that their previous book, THE FADE OUT, was not one of my favorites. That’s likely unfair on my part, but when compared the one before that – the astounding occult noir FATALE – it didn’t have the same energy. That leads us to KILL OR BE KILLED #1-2, a welcome return to occult noir storytelling, and a book that will set your nerve ending alight in the first few panels and has not stopped across the span of two outstanding issues to date.

The setup is clean and simple: Dylan is kind of a fuckup, and he’s approaching 30 with no signs of his being a fuckup going away. He’s in love with the wrong woman, his prospects are dim, and he pretty much has nothing going for him. So he decides to end it, jumping off the roof of a building.

He does not die (this is not a spoiler).

Instead, clothes lines and utility lines break his fall and he survives. Or so he thinks, until he is visited by a demon who tells him that he allowed him to survive, and in order to continue doing so, he owes a life a month in exchange. Dylan must become a cold-blooded killer in order to have a chance to live on and maybe – maybe – not become a total piece of shit.

Quite the conundrum, wouldn’t you say?

Phenomenal characterization, tasty dialogue, gorgeous art, fantastic story… KILL OR BE KILLED is, after two issues, looking like it could be the best Brubaker/Phillips collaboration ever, which is no mean feat. There isn’t a false note to be heard here, just page after page of amazing comics work, the kind that wanders off with a ton of awards. Certainly, if it maintains this level of quality, it will likely wind up at the top of my best-of list for 2016. Can’t recommend it highly enough.

Shifting gears, let’s take a look at another highly anticipated book that recently hit stands. Bryan Lee O’Malley is certainly a name that brings to mind A-list work. The SCOTT PILGRIM books vaulted him to the top of the comics stratosphere, and while the follow-up SECONDS didn’t sell as many copies, it was actually a stronger work that demonstrated just how talented the man truly is. Now he has arrived at Image to offer up his first foray into monthly comics, SNOTGIRL #1-2. What makes this branching out even more intriguing is that he is only writing the book; artist Leslie Hung is handling putting the pictures to paper, and seeing how their collaboration plays out is part of what makes the book so interesting to read.

snotgirl 1

Snotgirl is Lottie Person, a fashion blogger with a sharp sense of style and allergies that consistently make her miserable (I can relate to at least one of those things, and it isn’t the clothing). She’s young, attractive, kinda shallow, on a break from her boyfriend, and quite possibly… a murderer.

Not your standard comics setup, for sure.

O’Malley surrounds her with a fabulous cast of characters, each one with their own quirks and personalities, and he’s wonderful at putting them together on the page and seeing where those personalities take them. Aided and abetted by Hung’s incredibly energetic neo-manga artwork, the pages crackle with life and movement. It’s really quite something.

If you had told me of this premise and not told me of O’Malley’s involvement, I would have likely avoided this book like the plague. It doesn’t normally fall inside my interest range. But that’s what talent can do: overcome wariness and create interest out of nothingness. I’ll keep reading SNOTGIRL for the long term, I think, and that should tell you all you really need to know.

In the “best new concept” category, my vote goes to HORIZON #1-2, which spins alien invasion stories on their heads in an outstanding way. The setup: in the near future, Earth has truly hit a point where its resources are shot to hell, so a plan to leave and take over another planet is hatched. That planet, Valius, is not happy about that idea. At all. So a scout force of saboteurs is sent to Earth to make sure humanity’s plans for invasion never get off the ground.

Horizon_01-1

Told from the POV of the Valius scouts, HORIZON is an excellent piece of science fiction, an alien invasion story that asks you to root for the aliens. And the way that writer Brandon Thomas structures the tale, you don’t mind that at all. Thomas does an outstanding job of making the Valius crew interesting, complex, and heroic. He’s obviously put a great deal of thought into world-building, and it shows. Seeing Valius, and seeing what is will do to avoid invasion goes a long way into developing a rooting interest in the alien crew.

Thomas is partnered with artist Juan Cedeon here, and Cedeon’s work is terrific. His characters are grounded and realistic, his backgrounds and design work are lovely, and his action work is compelling. I liked the look of HORIZON all the way around.

Sometimes it can be easy for a book like this one to get lost in the mad jumble of Marvel and DC flooding the market, so I’m feeling a bit evangelical about it. HORIZON deserves all the eyeballs it can get. Pick up these first two issues, then pass them on to someone else so that they start picking it up. Let’s reward original thinking and good, solid comics.

Leave a Reply